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Sole, Yellowfin

Limanda aspera

Method of production - Caught at sea
Capture method - Demersal otter trawl
Capture area - Bering Sea, Aleutian Sea (FAO 67)
Stock area - All Areas
Stock detail - All Areas
Certification - Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Fish type - White flat fish

Sustainability rating Click for explaination of rating

This fish, caught by the methods and in the area listed above, is not the most sustainable choice of fish to eat. Click on the rating icon above to read more and on the alternatives tab below to find more sustainable fish to eat.


Sustainability overview

The stock is assessed as not subject to overfishing and is not currently overfished. In June 2010 the Alaska (Bering Sea and Aleutian Is (BSAI)) flatfish fishery was certified under the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) environmental standard for sustainable and well-managed fisheries. There are 5 flatfish species in the BSAI trawl fishery.

Biology

Yellowfin sole are a flatfish, with both eyes on one side of their body. Their eyed-side is olive to dark brown with dark mottling. Their back and belly (dorsal and anal) fins are yellowish on both sides of the body and have faint dark bars and a narrow dark line at their base and are named for the yellowish color of all of their fins. They are a relatively long-lived species with a maximum age of 31 years. Females as old as 39 have been recorded. Maturity in females occurs at 10-11 years. Spawning takes place in spring and summer.

Stock information

Stock area
All Areas

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Stock information
The stock is assessed as not subject to overfishing and is not currently overfished.

Management

Yellowfin sole is one of the most abundant flatfish species in the eastern Bering Sea and is the target of the largest flatfish fishery in the world. Alaska is responsible for the majority of the worldwide yellowfin sole catch. With the phasing out of foreign vessels the fishery has been completely domestic since 1990s.The North Pacific Fisheries Management Council manages the fishery in Alaska waters under the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Groundfish Fishery Management Plan. The fishery is regulated by a number of managment measures. The stock is fished from late winter through autumn with most of the harvest taken during the spring and summer. Harvests are restricted by a 2 million metric ton cap and halibut and crab bycatch limits. As of 2003 all sole must be retained for processing. In June 2010 the Alaska (Bering Sea and Aleutian Is (BSAI)) flatfish fishery was certified under the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) environmental standard for sustainable and well-managed fisheries. There are 5 flatfish species in the BSAI trawl fishery.

Capture information

Yellowfin sole are caught as part of a mixed flat fish fishery with bottom trawls over soft, sand bottoms. Fish species caught incidentally (bycatch) include Pacific cod, Pacific halibut, sole, rock and flathead, pollock, and Alaska plaice. Prohibited species catch include red king and snow crab. There are limits on the amount of halibut and crab that can be caught incidentally in this fishery. If these limits are exceeded, the fishery is closed.

Read more about capture methods

Alternatives

Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 2 and below are included as an alternative in the list below . Click on a name to show the sustainable options available.

Dab Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Flounder Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Halibut, Atlantic (Farmed) Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Halibut, Pacific

Sole, Dover sole, Common sole Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Turbot (Farmed)


References

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