As a charity MCS relies on your generous support

Donate

MCS Home

Good Fish Guide

return to search Return to search results

 

No image currently available for this fish

Basa, Tra, Catfish or Vietnamese River Cobbler

Pangasius bocourti & Pangasius hypophthalmus

Method of production - Farmed
Production country - Vietnam
Production method - Open net pens, GlobalGAP certification
Accreditation - GlobalGap
Fish type - White round fish

Sustainability rating To be Assessed


Sustainability overview

Pangasius farmed to GlobalGap certified production standards is a better choice to make for this farmed species. The GlobalGap certification addresses a number of issues of environmental concern, the auditing of which requires farm inspections and standard enforcement. There are a number of issues of environmental concern associated with production, these include: habitat alteration; freshwater impacts; nutrient and organic pollution; escapes; interactions with local wildlife and enforcement of regulations. Pangasius is a an omnivore and as such is not heavily reliant on marine proteins and oils to form part of its diet, however the fish used to produce the feed is currently not certified as being responsibly managed or sustainable. It is only by sourcing certified pangasius that you can be assured that the issues of critical environmental concern are being addressed.

Biology

The group of freshwater fish known as catfish are captured from the wild or farmed for food and displayed in public aquaria dependant on the species. This farmed species natural habitat is medium to large rivers in Asian countries such as Vietnam, where they can grow up to 44kg.There are omnivores, feeding on a diet of other fish, vegetable matter and crustacea. Pangasius bocourti is one of the most important farmed species in Vietnam.

Stock information

Stock area

View map areas

Stock information

Management

We are just updating our information please check back soon.

Production method

Open net pens, GlobalGAP certification

Farming in open net pens in river systems allows for interaction with the surrounding environment and, as such, has to be managed in such a way as to minimise negative environmental and ecological impacts.There are a number of issues of environmental concern associated with production, these include: habitat alteration; freshwater impacts; nutrient and organic pollution; escapes; interactions with local wildlife and enforcement of regulations

Read the MCS Aquaculture policy position paper

Alternatives

Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 2 and below are included as an alternative in the list below . Click on a name to show the sustainable options available.

Bass, seabass (Farmed)

Bream, Gilthead (Farmed) Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Cod, Atlantic Cod Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Coley, Saithe Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Haddock Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Hake, Cape

Hake, European Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Japanese amberjack, Yellowtail or Seriola

Pollock, Alaska, Walleye Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Pouting or Bib Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Sturgeon (Farmed) Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Tilapia

Whiting Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.


References
FAO (2010) Pangasius hypothalamus (Sauvage, 1878)- Cultured Aquatic Species Information Programme. Food Agric Organ United Nations

GGAP V5.0 (2016) Global Gap Farm Assurance, All Farm Base- Aquaculture Module, Control Points and Compliance Criteria, English Version 5.0, Edition 5.0- 02 July 2016, Obligatory From 01 July 2016.

GGAP (2016) Global Gap Compound Feed Manufacturing, General Rules, Addendum to Global Gap General Regulations, English Version 2.2, Valid from 01 August 2016.

Tacon AGJ, Metian M (2015) Feed Matters: Satisfying the Feed Demand of Aquaculture. Rev Fish Sci Aquac 23:1-10

Bartie KL, Austin FW, Diab A, Dickson C, Dung TT, Giacomini M, Crumlish M (2012) Intraspecific diversity of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates from diseased freshwater catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (Sauvage), cultured in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. J Fish Dis 35:671-682

Chuah L-O, Effarizah ME, Goni AM, Rusul G (2016) Antibiotic Application and Emergence of Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) in Global Catfish Aquaculture. Curr Environ Heal reports 3:118-127

Dung TT, Ngoc NTN, Thinh NQ, Thy DTM, Tuan NA, Shinn A, Crumlish M (2008) Common diseases of Pangasius catfish farmed in Viet Nam. Glob Aquac Advocate 11:77-78

Return to top Return to top

Sign up to get the latest marine information from the Marine Conservation Society

Enewsletter

Sign up to get all the latest marine related news from MCS


The UK charity for the protection of our seas, shores and wildlife.

Read more about MCS

The MCS website uses 'Cookies' to enhance your web experience. Please read our data and cookie policy.
If you do not wish to use cookies please read how to disable cookies. Don't show this message again